Free Shipping on Orders over $25!

50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds
50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds
50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, 50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds

50 Japanese Primrose Flower Seeds

Regular price
$2.99
Sale price
$2.99
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

Up for sale is one pack of 50 Japanese Primrose (Primula japonica). A perennial for zones 3 to 8, and mild zones like 10, Japanese Primrose create large spike type booms in a range of colors from pink to red to purple. Please note that primrose is a bit more challenging to germinate and we recommend you read the instructions below before purchasing.

We offer flat rate combined shipping on all orders, no limit on the amount or type of seed packets.

CULTURE

Soil temperature: 65 - 75 degrees fahrenheit
Germination lighting: Light
Depth: 1/8"
Germination days: 21 days
Plant spread: 12"
Plant height: 18"
Plant type: Perennial
Maturation days: 80 days

Primrose prefers to grow in moist shady conditions and will do best near a water source, like a pond or stream. If planting in your garden choose a spot that only gets morning sun and during hot summer months your will have to water frequently.

Primrose is a bit different in that it needs several cycles of freeze and thaw before they will germinate. Primrose will not germinate in late spring or summer and will not survive in hot climates where summer temperatures get above 100 degrees.

For zones 3-8 it's best to start primrose in pots outside in late winter or very early spring (you will need to have several days of freezing weather so don't wait too long in spring to start them). Start with a landscape pot that has drainage in the bottom and fill with a sterile potting mix. We make our own sterile potting mix by adding 1/3 peat , 1/3 coarse sand, and 1/3 sterilized compost (compost that you heat in your oven until any seeds are neutralized). You can also buy a commercial seed starting potting mix. Add your pre moistened soil to your pot and gently tap down, place this pot in a shallow dish that is around 1" deep. These seeds are very tiny and it is best to mix them with a small amount of sand before sowing them on the surface of your pots. Do not cover as they need light to germinate. Now take this pot, with the dish underneath, and place outside in an area that exposes it to cold weather but not directly exposed as any heavy rain will wash away the contents of your pot. When we grow seeds like this we place them near our house so that they are protected by the eaves of the roof, or you can place them at the base of an evergreen shrub that will protect them. The easiest way to have unsuccessful germination is to let your soil mixture dry out as these like moist (but not soaking wet) material to germinate, so keep your small dish under your pot filled with water. Keep your pots outside and transplant your seedlings into your garden in spring once they have their second set of true leaves and are around 2" tall. Primrose prefers to grow in very rich soil so amend heavily with compost before planting.

If in mild zones that don't get freezing weather, like parts of CA or HI, you will have to trick your seeds into thinking they have gone through some freezes and thaws. This is a more challenging way to germinate these seeds but not impossible. Start with a tupperware type container that has a clear lid (make sure this container is small enough to fit in your refrigerator). Fill with sterile potting material that is pre-moistened and tap down. Mix your seeds with around 1/4 cup of sand and sow on the surface. Poke a few holes in the container lid and start your mix in the fridge for two weeks. After two weeks move your container to a spot in your house that has some light, making sure your potting material does not dry out. Leave in your house for a week for so and then place in your freezer to a couple of days and then move to your fridge for a week or so. Repeat this cycle two of three times moving your pot from cold to room temperature to freezing. After repeating this cycle leave your pot inside your house under a light source that does not get hot as primrose will not germinate if it gets above 80 degrees. Once seedlings have their second set of true leaves transplant to a shady part of your garden.